Tackling pension scams head on

With pension scam losses totalling millions each year, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has reaffirmed its commitment to tackling scams in order to ensure the long-term health of the pensions market.

In a speech to delegates at the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association, the FCA’s Executive Director of Markets Sarah Pritchard said steps have been taken to stop scams reaching consumers, “We want people to be better protected from the risks of scams and know how to protect themselves against them. Our ScamSmart campaign… gives knowledge and tools to help people protect themselves from scams.”

Simple steps

We can all take simple steps to protect ourselves against potential scams.
These include:

  1. Make sure you check who you’re
    dealing with
  2. Don’t give out personal information you
    wouldn’t share with a stranger
  3. Don’t feel pressurised into making
    quick decisions.

Good news – new measures

New regulations came into force on 30 November 2021 to protect pension savers and stop suspicious scam transfers, as pension trustees and scheme managers received new powers to intervene. Previously pension providers were not allowed to refuse to carry out a transfer where the saver has the right to do so, even if they were suspicious, but the new regulations will enable trustees to prevent a transfer request if they see evidence of ‘red flags.’

It is important to take professional advice before making any decision relating to your personal finances. Information within this newsletter is based on our current understanding of taxation and can be subject to change in future. It does not provide individual tailored investment advice and is for guidance only. Some rules may vary in different parts of the UK; please ask for details. We cannot assume legal liability for any errors or omissions it might contain. Levels and bases of, and reliefs from, taxation are those currently applying or proposed and are subject to change; their value depends on the individual circumstances of the investor.

The value of investments can go down as well as up and you may not get back the full amount you invested. The past is not a guide to future performance and past performance may not necessarily be repeated. If you withdraw from an investment in the early years, you may not get back the full amount you invested. Changes in the rates of exchange may have an adverse effect on the value or price of an investment in sterling terms if it is denominated in a foreign currency. Taxation depends on individual circumstances as well as tax law and HMRC practice which can change.

The information contained within this newsletter is for information only purposes and does not constitute financial advice. The purpose of this newsletter is to provide technical and general guidance and should not be interpreted as a personal recommendation or advice.

The Financial Conduct Authority does not regulate advice on deposit accounts and some forms of tax advice.